Dosha Quiz

 

Ayurveda is a system of healing unlike any other, offering a unique approach to health care in the form of self-discovery. With its roots in ancient India, Ayurveda is a tradition thought to be over five thousand years old. Today, Ayurvedic medicine is respected by the government of India and is offered in treatment centers and hospitals around the country.1 Join us as we explore Ayurveda’s westward expansion, its basic principles,

An Introduction to Your Mind-Body Type
The Elements and the Doshas

Embody Your True Potential

All of the doshas contain all five elements (as do all things in nature), but each is predominantly composed of two elements.

 

Dosha Primary Elements
Vata Air + Ether
Pitta Fire + Water
Kapha Water + Earth

 

As with the elements, all three of the doshas can be found in everyone and everything, but in different proportions. They combine to create different climates, different foods, different species, and even different individuals within the same species. In fact, the particular ratio of vata, pitta, and kapha within each of us provides us with a blueprint for optimal health (otherwise known as our constitution), and garners a significant influence on our individual physical, mental, and emotional character traits—as well as our unique strengths and vulnerabilities.

This Dosha Quiz will give you a breakdown of your Ayurvedic mind-body type—Vata, Pitta, and Kapha—to enhance your health & well-being.

 The three doshas—Vata, Pitta, and Kapha—are derived from the five elements. Also known as mind-body types, the doshas express unique blends of physical, emotional, and mental characteristics. In Ayurveda, health is defined as the dynamic state of balance between mind, body, and environment. You can achieve and maintain a vibrant and joyful state of health by identifying your mind-body type and creating a lifestyle that supports your unique nature.

 

You’ll find out your dominant dosha, which reflects the dominant force in your overall mind-body makeup. You’ll also learn about your secondary and least dominant dosha and how they play a role in your mind-body physiology.

Take your quiz

Signs and Symptoms of Vata Imbalance

Is your vata out of balance? If so, you may be experiencing some of the following signs or symptoms:

  • nervousness, anxiety, panic, fear
  • twitches, tics, tremors, spasms
  • dry or chapped skin
  • constipation, gas, bloating, dry, hard stools
  • low body weight
  • dislike of cold and wind
  • difficulty tolerating loud noises
  • light, interrupted sleep
  • spacey, scattered feeling
  • excess thinking or worrying

To decrease vata, Ayurveda has given us dietary, lifestyle and herbal treatment strategies. Here are a few underlying concepts that these strategies are based on:

  • Routine
  • Warmth
  • Serenity
  • Nourishment

General Guidelines for a Vata-Pacifying Diet

Enjoy:

  • Foods that are naturally sweet, sour, and salty in taste.
  • Warm foods, both energetically and in temperature. Whole, freshly cooked foods.
  • A limited selection of legumes, including mung dahl, tofu or tempeh that is well-cooked and warm soy milk spiced with cinnamon and nutmeg.
  • Warming spices like ginger, black pepper, cinnamon and cumin, but not extremely hot spices like cayenne pepper.
  • Plenty of room temperature or warm drinks.
  • Dairy, as long as it is not very cold. Avoid drinking milk with your meals. It is best to have it warm and spiced with cinnamon and nutmeg, at least an hour before or after other food.
  • A generous amount of high-quality oils or ghee in your daily diet.
  • Routine times for your meals.
  • Taking a deep breath after swallowing your last bite and heading off for your next activity.
  • Eating your meal in a peaceful environment.

Avoid:

  • Foods that are bitter, astringent, and pungent.
  • Foods that are cooling, both energetically and in temperature.
  • Dry and light foods (e.g. popcorn and crackers).
  • Too much raw food, especially in the mornings and evenings (salads, carrot sticks, raw fruit, fresh fruit and vegetable juices, etc.)
  • Most beans, including cold soy products.
  • Highly processed foods (like canned or frozen foods, “TV” dinners or pastries).
  • Cold or carbonated drinks.
  • Caffeine, nicotine and other stimulants.
  • Overeating or eating very heavy meals.
  • Eating fresh fruit or drinking fruit juice within ½ hour of any other food.
  • Foods or drinks that contain refined sugar or corn syrup.
  • Deep fried foods.
  • Hard alcohol.

Vata-Pacifying Herbal Remedies

Herbs are useful allies when it comes to balancing the doshas. Ayurveda has a long history detailing the use of herbs and herbal combinations. Some Ayurvedic practitioners will customize herbal formulas to suit the unique constitutions of their clients. General formulas based on traditional combinations of herbs are also used. Below are some formulations that are especially useful for balancing vata. Some Ayurvedic practitioners will customize herbal formulas to suit the unique constitutions of their clients. General formulas based on traditional combinations of herbs are also used. Below are some formulations that are especially useful for balancing vata.

  • For a broad spectrum vata pacifying herbal formula consider Healthy Vata
  • To support mental calmness and well-being consider Tranquil Mind
  • To balance vata in the joints, nerves and muscles consider Joint Support
  • For dry or chapped skin consider Vata Massage Oil
  • To support healthy elimination consider Triphala
  • To support healthy weight gain consider Ashwagandha
  • For dislike of cold and wind consider Healthy Vata
  • For difficulty tolerating loud noises consider Healthy Vata
  • To Support a sound, restful sleep consider I Sleep Soundly
  • To Support stability and grounded awareness consider Mental Clarity
  • To support healthy, comfortable digestion consider Vata Digest

General Guidelines for a Vata-Pacifying Lifestyle

Enjoy:

  • Live as you would imagine a master would: with calm awareness and a gentle pace.
  • A regular, daily routine with regular times for eating, sleeping, working, etc.
  • A daily 10–20 minute self-massage with ½ cup warm sesame oil. Visit the shala for more information on abhyanga.
  • A gentle exercise routine that includes a calm, stretch-focused form of yoga, Tai qi (tai chi), qi gong (chi gong), walking, swimming (but don’t get chilled) about five times per week.
  • Keeping warm, no matter what the weather.
  • Sweet, soothing music, smells, scenes and company.
  • Vata-reducing oils.
  • Vata-reducing herbs and remedies.

Signs and Symptoms of Pitta Imbalance

Is your pitta out of balance? If so, you may be experiencing some of the following signs or symptoms:

  • red, inflamed rash, acne, cold sores
  • acute inflammation in body or joints
  • acid reflux, gastric or peptic ulcers, heartburn
  • nausea or discomfort upon missing meals
  • loose stools
  • uncomfortable feeling of heat in the body
  • frustration, anger, irritability
  • judgment, impatience, criticism, intolerance
  • red, inflamed or light-sensitive eyes
  • excessive perfectionist tendencies

To decrease pitta, Ayurveda has given us dietary, lifestyle and herbal treatment strategies. Here are a few underlying concepts that these strategies are based on:

  • Cooling
  • Surrendering
  • Moderation

General Guidelines for a Pitta-Pacifying Diet

Enjoy:

  • Foods that are naturally sweet, bitter, and astringent.
  • Cooling foods, both energetically and in temperature.
  • A balance of whole, freshly cooked foods and fresh, raw foods.
  • Most beans.
  • Cooling herbs and spices like coriander, cilantro, fennel and cardamom.
  • Dairy, if you digest it well, but avoid drinking milk with your meals. It is best to have it at least an hour before or after other food.
  • A moderate amount of high-quality olive, sunflower and coconut oils or ghee in your daily diet.
  • Routine times for your meals.
  • Taking a deep breath after swallowing your last bite and heading off for your next activity.
  • Eating your meal in a peaceful environment.

Avoid:

  • Foods that are pungent, sour, and salty.
  • Warming foods, both energetically and in temperature.
  • Chili and cayenne peppers.
  • Highly processed foods (like canned or frozen foods, “TV” dinners or pastries).
  • Eating fresh fruit or drinking fruit juice within ½ hour of any other food.
  • Caffeine, nicotine, and other stimulants.
  • Red meat.
  • Deep fried foods.
  • Alcohol, except for an occasional beer or white wine.

Pitta-Pacifying Herbal Remedies

Herbs are useful allies when it comes to balancing the doshas. Ayurveda has a long history detailing the use of herbs and herbal combinations. Some Ayurvedic practitioners will customize herbal formulas to suit the unique constitutions of their clients. General formulas based on traditional combinations of herbs are also used. Below are some formulations that are especially useful for balancing pitta.

  • For a broad spectrum pitta pacifying herbal formula consider Healthy Pitta
  • To support healthy skin and a clear complexion consider Blood Cleanse
  • To balance pitta in the joints and muscles consider Joint Support
  • To support healthy digestion and a comfortable post meal experience consider Pitta Digest
  • For uncomfortable feeling of heat in the body consider Healthy Pitta
  • For frustration, anger, irritability consider Mental Clarity or Healthy Pitta
  • For judgment, impatience, criticism, intolerance consider Mental Clarity or Healthy Pitta
  • To Soothe the eyes and support their proper function consider Triphala
  • For excessive perfectionist tendencies consider Healthy Pitta

General Guidelines for a Pitta-Pacifying Lifestyle

Enjoy:

  • Surrendering rather than controlling.
  • A regular, daily routine with regular times for eating, sleeping, working, etc. Make sure you have time to play and to relax as well as to work.
  • A 10–20 minute self-massage daily with ½ cup warm sunflower or coconut oil before bathing. Visit the body work at the shala for more information on abhyanga.
  • A moderate exercise routine that includes a challenging form of yoga, swimming or biking, about five times per week. Avoid exercising during the hot part of the day.
  • Keeping yourself cool, mind and body.
  • Sweet and soothing music, smells, scenes, and company.

Signs and Symptoms of Kapha Imbalance

Is your kapha out of balance? If so, you are probably experiencing some of the following signs or symptoms:

  • excess mucous
  • thick, white tongue coat
  • slow, sticky, sluggish bowel movements
  • high body weight
  • difficulty rising in the morning
  • feeling slow, foggy, dull, lethargic or heavy
  • easily attached or possessive
  • overly sentimental
  • complacent or stubborn
  • tendency for “emotional overeating”

To reduce or pacify kapha, Ayurveda has given us dietary, lifestyle and herbal treatment strategies. Here are a few underlying concepts that these strategies are based on:

  • Stimulation
  • Exercise
  • Lightening
  • Warming
  • Drying

General Guidelines for a Kapha-Pacifying Diet

Enjoy:

  • Foods that are pungent, bitter, or astringent in taste.
  • Warm foods, both energetically and in temperature.
  • Heating spices—like chili, black or cayenne pepper, ginger, cinnamon, and cumin.
  • Whole, freshly cooked foods.
  • Light, dry, and warm foods.
  • Honey.
  • Only room temperature or warm drinks.
  • Most beans. Mung dahl, well-cooked tofu or tempeh, or warm soy milk are all okay.
  • Lots of veggies.
  • A minimal amount of high-quality corn, canola, sesame, sunflower oil, or ghee in your daily diet.
  • Routine times for your meals.
  • Taking a deep breath after swallowing your last bite and heading off for your next activity.
  • Eating your meal in a peaceful environment.

Avoid:

  • Foods that are sweet, sour, and/or salty.
  • Cooling foods, both energetically and in temperature.
  • Heavy and oily foods (e.g. cheese, pudding, nuts, cake).
  • Highly processed foods (e.g. canned or frozen foods, “TV” dinners or pastries).
  • Cold or carbonated drinks.
  • Overeating or eating heavy meals.
  • Eating fresh fruit or drinking fruit juice within ½ hour of any other food.
  • Red meat.
  • Foods or drinks that contain refined sugar or corn syrup.
  • Deep fried foods.
  • Alcohol, except for an occasional glass of dry red or white wine.

Kapha-Pacifying Herbal Remedies

Herbs are useful allies when it comes to balancing the doshas. Ayurveda has a long history detailing the use of herbs and herbal combinations. Some Ayurvedic practitioners will customize herbal formulas to suit the unique constitutions of their clients. General formulas based on traditional combinations of herbs are also used. Below are some formulations that are especially useful for balancing kapha.

  • For a broad spectrum kapha pacifying herbal formula consider Healthy Kapha
  • To support the healthy elimination of excess mucous consider Lung Formula
  • If you have a thick, white coating on your tongue, consider Triphala to support natural detoxification
  • To support healthy elimination consider Triphala
  • To promote optimal weight management consider Trim Support
  • For difficulty rising in the morning consider Healthy Kapha
  • For feeling slow, foggy, dull, lethargic or heavy consider Mental Clarity or Healthy Kapha
  • To encourage letting go of attachments consider Triphala and Healthy Kapha
  • To support emotional composure consider Mental Clarity
  • To support mental flexibility and motivation consider Mental Clarity
  • To support healthy eating habits consider Trim Support and Triphala

General Guidelines for a Kapha-Pacifying Lifestyle

Enjoy:

  • An energetic routine. Avoid stagnation.
  • Stimulating your body and mind on a daily basis.
  • A 10–20 minute self-massage daily with ½ cup warm sesame oil before bathing. Visit the shala for more information on abhyanga.
  • A vigorous exercise routine that includes jogging, hiking, biking, vigorous forms of yoga or martial arts, or other challenging forms of exercise, a minimum of five times per week.
  • Keeping warm and dry, no matter what the weather.
  • Lively and invigorating music, smells, experiences, and company.
Pitta-Pacifying Foods

Pitta is oily, sharp, hot, light, spreading, and liquid, so eating foods that neutralize these qualities—foods that are dry, mild, cooling, grounding, stabilizing, and dense—serve to balance excess pitta.

Kapha-Pacifying Foods
Kapha is heavy, cool, oily, and smooth, so eating foods that neutralize these qualities—foods that are light, warm, dry, and rough—can help to balance excess kapha.

 

Vata-Pacifying Foods
Vata is cool, dry, rough and light, so eating foods that neutralize these qualities—foods that are warm, moist, oily, smooth, and nourishing—can help to balance excess vata.
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